Frigates Anzac-class warships


 

These warships that belong to the Anzac class, which in some books are also referred as the MEKO 200 ANZ type) are an advanced a class of ten frigates. However, only eight of them are currently commissioned by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). The other two frigates are under command of the Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN).

The project for developing the Anzac-class frigates was initiated during the 1980s. At that time, the RAN started thinking to substitute the River-class destroyer escorts with a mid-capability patrol frigate, and settled on the idea of modifying a proven foreign design for Australian conditions.

Approximately around the same time, the RNZN was also considering to replace their Leander-class frigates while maintaining blue-water capabilities. Therefore, as both nations were seeking warships of similar capabilities, the decision was made in 1987 to collaborate on their acquisition. The project name (and later, the class name) is taken from the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps of the First World War.

Although the initial plan was to build twelve ship in 1986, only ten were finally constructed. The reason was that the plan for these frigates had opposition in New Zeland. By 1989, the project had selected a proposal by Germany’s Blohm + Voss, based on their MEKO 200 design, to be built in Australia by AMECON at Williamstown, Victoria. The modular design of the frigates allowed sections to be constructed at Whangarei, New Zealand and Newcastle, New South Wales in addition to Williamstown. The RAN ordered eight ships, while the RNZN ordered two. Although the RNZN had the option to add two more, finally only two remained operated by them.

In 1992, work started on the frigates; 3,600-tonne (3,500-long-ton) ships capable of a 27-knot (50 km/h; 31 mph) top speed, and a range of 6,000 nautical miles (11,000 km; 6,900 mi) at 18 knots (33 km/h; 21 mph).

They were not heavily armed warships for surface combat because the armament initially consisted of a single 5-inch gun and a point-defence missile system, supported by a missile-armed helicopter. In addition, the ships were fitted for but not with a torpedo system, anti-ship missiles, and a close-in weapons system.

Both the RAN and RNZN have projects to improve the frigates’ capabilities by fitting the additional weapons, along with updates to other systems and equipment.

The latest reports indicate that, as of 2014, all ten ships are still in service. The RAN intends to start replacing theirs in 2024, while the RNZN ships will remain active until around 2030.

The RAN Anzac-class frigates:

 



▽ Royal Australian Navy

 

HMAS_Stuart_FFH_153

Frigate Surface Force
The Australian Navy Frigate
Surface Force

 

HMAS Collins-class Rankin

Submarine Force
The Australian Navy
Submarine Force

 

HMAS_Canberra

Amphibious Force
The Australian Navy
Amphibious Force

 

HMAS_Perth

Patrol Force
The Australian Navy
Patrol Force

 

HMAS Ballarat

MineHunting Force
The Australian Navy
Mine Warfare Force

 

HMAS Stuart

Replenishment and Survey Force
The Australian Navy
Replenishment and Survey Force

 

HMAS_Warramunga_(FFH_152)

Training Ships and other Non-Commissioned Units
The Australian Navy Training Ships
and Other Non-Commissioned Units

▽Warships in the Royal Australian Navy (RAN)

 
Frigate surface Force (11): The principal striking force of the RAN comes from the eleven frigates of the surface force: eight of them belong to the Anzac class and the rest (three) are units from the Adelaide class.

 
Submarine Striking Force (6): The RAN operates six Collins-class submarines. Due to technical and manpower problems these submarines might be replaced in the future by Japanese Soryu-class submarines.

 
Amphibious Force (3): There are a huge variety of amphibious warfare units, which include two Canberra-class landing helicopter dock ships and the landing ship HMAS Choules.

 
Patrol Boat Force (13): There are thirteen Armidale-class patrol boats that perform coastal and economic exclusion zone patrols.

 
Mine Hunting and Warfare Force (4 + 2 in reserve):
There are four Huon-class vessels that are used for minehunting and clearance (another two are commissioned but in reserve since October 2011).

 
Replenishment Force (2 + 6 survey duties):
The task for replenishment at sea is provided by two ships, Sirius and Success. In addition, there are two Leeuwin-class and four Paluma-class vessels perform survey and charting duties.

 
Training Units (1 + 1 support vessel + 2 patrol boats):
The RAN operates the sail training ship Young Endeavour, the support vessel ADV Ocean Shield, and two Cape-class patrol boats. The latter ones are acquired thanks to the Australian Border Force.


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