Panther Ausf G 1/72 scale tanks and history


Panther Pz.Kpfw V Ausf. G 1/72 scale tanks

 

Panther Eastern Front 1944

Panther Eastern Front 1944  Source: Bundesarchiv, Bild 101I-244-2321-34 / Waidelich / CC-BY-SA 3.0

 

Probably, together with the Tiger I and King Tiger, the Panther Pz. Kpfw V is one of the famous medium/heavy tanks during the world war II on the German side. The shape and engine of the tank were quite revolutionary and offered to the German Panzer Division a technical superiority against Allied and Russian forces. The Panther was a prompt German effort to counter the Soviet T-34 and to replace the Panzer III and Panzer IV. Nevertheless, it served alongside the Panzer IV and the heavier Tiger I until the end of the war. It is considered one of the best tanks of World War II for its excellent firepower and protection. Its reliability was less impressive. Indeed, the first Panthers suffered from many mechanical and engine problems. Only by mid-1944, the Panther was at its peak performance and widely regarded as the most formidable tank on the battlefield.

The Battle of Kursk, contrary to the general opinion that the Panthers played a formidable role, showed the weakness of the tank. Because of the technical problems, and the necessity to examine and repair the tanks, they were delivered with some weeks of delay to the battlefield. This decision delayed the start of the Operation Zitadelle for a total of two months. This time was crucial for Soviets to collect more intelligence evidences on the offensive, and prepare in depth  a huge concentration of minefields, anti-tank guns, trenches and artillery defences, which later showed up to be decisive in the result of the battle.

 

During World War II, economy was an important strategic element in the conflict. The cost of a Panther tank raised up to 117,100 Reichmarks (RM). This compared with 82,500 RM for the StuG III, 96,163 RM for the Panzer III, 103,462 RM for the Panzer IV, and 250,800 RM for the Tiger I. This numbers suggest why the Germans were so interested in the Panther V. The tank had better armor, mobility and weapon systems than the Panzer IV, but almost the same price.

 

 

Production line and variants:

Model Number Date Notes
Prototype 2 Sep 1942 Designated V1 and V2
Ausf. D 842 Jan 1943 to Sept 1943  
Ausf. A 2,200 Aug 1943 to Aug 1944 Sometimes called Ausf. A2
Ausf. G approx 2,961 Mar 1944 to Apr 1945
Befehlspanzer Panther 329 May 1943 to Apr 1945 Converted on the production line.
Beobachtungspanzer Panther 1 1944 Converted
Bergepanther 339 1943 to 1945 61 more converted from rebuilt chassis

Panther production line in 1944.

Panther Production line in 1944.

                                                Source Bundesarchiv, Bild 101I-635-3966-27 / Hebenstreit / CC-BY-SA 3.0

 

The manufacturers have also working hard providing more and more models for the Panther V at 1/72 and 1/35 scales. These models do not cover most of the variants of the tank but also try to illustrate the different units that operate the tank by specific emblems, divisional symbols and camouflage colors and patterns.

In what follows, we show some of the best models available at 1/72 scale for the Panther  Pz.Kpfw V and its variants, Ausf. A, D, G:

 

1/72 Panther D Early Production 4./Pz.Rgt. “Groβdeutschland” Karachev 1943

While it’s the impressive Tiger I tank that usually attracts the most attention, it was the Panther that in the long run was a more important tank to Germany during WWII. This approximately 45-tonne medium tank represented a good balance of well-sloped armor protection, lethal firepower and able cross-country mobility, the design being inspired by the highly successful Russian T-34. Beginning in December 1942, a total of 842 Ausf.D examples were manufactured through to September 1943, at which time it was superseded by the improved Ausf.A. Its combat debut occurred during Operation Zitadelle in the titanic Battle of Kursk on the Eastern Front, and the Sd.Kfz.171 Panther fought bravely until the dying days of the Third Reich. Its 7.5cm KwK 42 L/70 cannon took a heavy toll on enemy armored vehicles whenever and wherever they were encountered. The Ausf.D is easily identified by the letterbox hatch opening for the glacis machine gun, pistol ports on the turret sides and a drum cupola.

1/72 Panther Ausf. G Tank

 

The German Panther tank was designed in response to the appearance of the Russian T-34 which seriously challenged the existing German tanks. Like the T-34, the Panther had long barrelled L/70 70mm gun, large road wheels, and sloped armor for better protection. This version had the late style steel road wheels designed to reduce the need for rubber which was in short supply.

  1/72 Panther Ausf G – Two Kits (Tanks) Italeri

1/72 Panzer V Panther Ausf. D/A

 

After the massed appearance of the Soviet T-34 the Germans developed the V Panther armoured combat vehicle (Sd.Kfz 171) which was used for the first time as version D in 1943. The necessary improvements gave rise to version A at the end of 1943. With its 7.5 cm 42 L/70 combat vehicle gun, by the end of the war the Panther had proved its superiority to most enemy combat tanks. The V 12 cylinder Otto engine with a capacity of 600 HP provided the 44,800 kg heavy Panther with a max. speed of up to 55 km/h. It was crewed by five men.

Panther Ausf F Tank 1/72 Hasegawa

 

Lindberg 1:72 scale Panther G Tank

 

HASEGAWA Pz.Kpfw V Panther Ausf.G (1/72 Scale)


PzKpfw V Panther – 1944 diecast 1:72 model

 

Armourfast Panther Ausf G Tank (Set of 2) (1/72-Scale)

 

Panther Ausf.D Late Production 1./Pz.Rgt.24, France 1944 Vehicle

 

Panther Ausf.D Late Production, Russia 1943 Model Kit

 

While it’s the impressive Tiger I tank that usually attracts the most attention, it was the Panther that in the long run was a more important tank to Germany during WWII. This approximately 45-tonne medium tank represented a good balance of well-sloped armor protection, lethal firepower and able cross-country mobility, the design being inspired by the highly successful Russian T-34. Beginning in December 1942, a total of 842 Ausf.D examples were manufactured through September 1943, at which time it was superseded by the improved Ausf.A. It’s combat debut occurred during Operation Zitadelle in the titanic Battle of Kursk on the Eastern Front, and the Sd.Kfz.171 Panther fought bravely until the dying days of the Third Reich. Its 7.5cm KwK 42 L/70 cannon took a heavy toll on enemy armored vehicles whenever and wherever they were encountered. The Ausf.D is easily identified by the letterbox hatch opening for the glacis machine gun, pistol ports on the turret sides and a drum cupola.

 1:72 Destroyed Panther (145×90 mm) Diorama Base

WWII German Panzergrenaidier Kursk 1943 1/72 Scale


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