Submarines Collins-class


All the Australian submarine force is based on Collins-class submarines. In total, it represents a fleet of 6 submarines operated by the RAN. The Collins class takes its name from Australian Vice Admiral John Augustine Collins; all six submarines are named after significant RAN personnel who distinguished themselves in action during World War II. The boats were the first submarines to be constructed in Australia, prompting widespread improvements in Australian industry.

Decades ago, the planning for a new design to replace the RAN’s Oberon-class submarines began in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Proposals were received from seven companies; two were selected for a funded study to determine the winning design, which was announced in mid-1987. The submarines, enlarged versions of Swedish shipbuilder Kockums’Västergötland class and originally referred to as the Type 471, were constructed between 1990 and 2003 in South Australia by the Australian Submarine Corporation (ASC).

For those interested in knowing details on the project of the Collins submarines, I recommend this book.

The submarines have been the subject of incidents and technical problems since the design phase, including accusations of foul play and bias during the design selection, improper handling of design changes during construction, major capability deficiencies in the first submarines, and ongoing technical problems throughout the early life of the class. These problems have been compounded by the inability of the RAN to retain sufficient personnel to operate the submarines—by 2008, only three could be manned, and between 2009 and 2012, on average two or fewer were fully operational. The resulting negative press has led to a poor public perception of the Collins class.

The Collins class is expected to remain in service until the 2020s. Planning for a replacement class of up to 12 vessels commenced in 2007. The new boats are predicted to enter service from 2025, and be active until the 2070s. It is possible that the new boats belong to the Japanese-developed Soryu-class, a world-class submarine with highest standards in stealth and non-nuclear energy systems.


▽ Royal Australian Navy

 

HMAS_Stuart_FFH_153

Frigate Surface Force
The Australian Navy Frigate
Surface Force

 

HMAS Collins-class Rankin

Submarine Force
The Australian Navy
Submarine Force

 

HMAS_Canberra

Amphibious Force
The Australian Navy
Amphibious Force

 

HMAS_Perth

Patrol Force
The Australian Navy
Patrol Force

 

HMAS Ballarat

MineHunting Force
The Australian Navy
Mine Warfare Force

 

HMAS Stuart

Replenishment and Survey Force
The Australian Navy
Replenishment and Survey Force

 

HMAS_Warramunga_(FFH_152)

Training Ships and other Non-Commissioned Units
The Australian Navy Training Ships
and Other Non-Commissioned Units

▽Warships in the Royal Australian Navy (RAN)

Frigate surface Force (11): The principal striking force of the RAN comes from the eleven frigates of the surface force: eight of them belong to the Anzac class and the rest (three) are units from the Adelaide class.
Submarine Striking Force (6): The RAN operates six Collins-class submarines. Due to technical and manpower problems these submarines might be replaced in the future by Japanese Soryu-class submarines.
Amphibious Force (3): There are a huge variety of amphibious warfare units, which include two Canberra-class landing helicopter dock ships and the landing ship HMAS Choules.
Patrol Boat Force (13): There are thirteen Armidale-class patrol boats that perform coastal and economic exclusion zone patrols.
Mine Hunting and Warfare Force (4 + 2 in reserve):
There are four Huon-class vessels that are used for minehunting and clearance (another two are commissioned but in reserve since October 2011).
Replenishment Force (2 + 6 survey duties):
The task for replenishment at sea is provided by two ships, Sirius and Success. In addition, there are two Leeuwin-class and four Paluma-class vessels perform survey and charting duties.
Training Units (1 + 1 support vessel + 2 patrol boats):
The RAN operates the sail training ship Young Endeavour, the support vessel ADV Ocean Shield, and two Cape-class patrol boats. The latter ones are acquired thanks to the Australian Border Force.


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