World War I


The decision to enter in the World War I was not easy but Japan entered World War I on the side of the Entente, against Germany and Austria-Hungary, as a consequence of the 1902 Anglo-Japanese Alliance.

In the Siege of Tsingtao, the Japanese Navy helped seize the German colony of Tsingtao. During the siege, beginning on 5 September 1914, Wakamiya conducted the world’s first successful sea-launched air strikes. On 6 September 1914, in the very first air-sea battle in history, a Farman aircraft launched by Wakamiya attacked the Austro-Hungarian cruiser Kaiserin Elisabethand the German gunboat Jaguar off Tsingtao. Four Maurice Farman seaplanes bombarded German land targets like communication and command centers, and damaged a German minelayer in the Tsingtao peninsula from September to 6 November 1914 when the Germans surrendered.

A battle group was also sent to the central Pacific in August and September to pursue the German East Asiatic squadron, which then moved into the Southern Atlantic, where it encountered British naval forces and was destroyed at the Battle of the Falkland Islands. Japan seized former German possessions in northern Micronesia, which remained Japanese colonies until the end of World War II, under the League of Nations’ South Pacific Mandate.

Hard pressed in Europe, where she had only a narrow margin of superiority against Germany, Britain had requested, but was denied, the loan of Japan’s four newest Kongō-class battlecruisers (Kongō, Hiei, Haruna, and Kirishima), the first ships in the world to be equipped with 356 mm (14 in) guns, and the most formidable battlecruisers in the world at the time.[

IJN Azuma at Portsmounth

IJN Azuma at Portsmounth

Following a further request by the British and the initiation of unrestricted submarine warfare by Germany the Japanese, in March 1917, sent a special force of destroyers to the Mediterranean. This force, consisting of one armoured cruiser, Akashi as flotilla leader and eight of the Navy’s newest destroyers (Ume, Kusunoki, Kaede, Katsura, Kashiwa, Matsu, Sugi, and Sakaki), under Admiral Satō Kōzō, was based in Malta and efficiently protected allied shipping between Marseille, Taranto, and ports in Egypt until the end of the War.[69] In June, Akashi was replaced by Izumo, and four more destroyers were added (Kashi, Hinoki, Momo, and Yanagi). They were later joined by the cruiser Nisshin. By the end of the war, the Japanese had escorted 788 allied transports. One destroyer, Sakaki, was torpedoed on 11 June 1917 by a German submarine with the loss of 59 officers and men. A memorial at the Kalkara Naval Cemetery in Malta was dedicated to the 72 Japanese sailors who died in action during the Mediterranean convoy patrols.

In 1918, ships such as Azuma were assigned to convoy escort in the Indian Ocean between Singapore and the Suez Canal as part of Japan’s contribution to the war effort under the Anglo-Japanese alliance.

After the conflict, the Japanese Navy received seven German submarines as spoils of war, which were brought to Japan and analysed, contributing greatly to the development of the Japanese submarine industry.


▽ Imperial Japanese Navy – Nihon Kaigun

 

organization of the imperial japanese navy

Nihon Kaigun organization
The structure and history of the
Imperial Japanese Navy

 

 

aircraft carriers of the imperial japanese navy

Aircraft Carriers
The battle and light aircraft carriers
of the Imperial Japanese Navy

 

 

battleships of the Imperial Japanese Navy

Battleships
The Battleships and Battlecruisers of
the Imperial Japanese Navy

 

 

heavy cruisers of the imperial japanese navy

Heavy Cruisers
The heavy cruisers of the
Imperial Japanese Navy

 

 

light cruisers of the imperial japanese navy

Light Cruisers
The light cruisers
of the Imperial Japanese Navy

 

 

destroyers of the imperial japanese navy

Destroyers
The destroyers squadrons of the
Imperial Japanese Navy

 

 

submarines of the imperial japanese navy

Submarines
The submarines fleet
of the Imperial Japanese Navy

 

 

auxiliary ships of the imperial japanese navy

Auxiliary Ships
The training, hospital, and other
auxiliary ships in the IJN

 

 

timeline of the japanese imperial navy warships

The TimeLine of ships
The design and operations
timeline records of the IJN warships

 

 

japanese land-based air groups

Naval Air Groups
The Land-Based Japanese
Navy Air-Groups

 

 

Japanese navy landing forces

Naval Landing Forces 1928-1945
Japanese Special Naval Landing Forces (SNLF),
Landing Forces (SNLF) 海軍特別陸戦隊

 

 

japanese secret weapons and technologies

Secret Weapons of the IJN
The secret weapons and teachnologies
of the Imperial Japanese Navy

 

 

strategic plans and doctrines of the IJN

Strategic Plans of the IJN
The strategic doctrines and
plans of the IJN

▽ Simulations & Wargames

▽ World War II: Pacific Theater

 

war in the pacific: admiral edition computer game

War in the Pacific: Admiral Edition
A computer-based simulation of
the entire Pacific War with incredible detail.

 

 

Empire of the sun_2nd edition boardgame wargame

The Empire of the Sun (2nd Ed.)
An strategy boardgame for the
Pacific War with solitaire playability.

 

 

pacific war boardgame

Pacific War
A fantastic monster game for the
Pacific War with many scenarios.

 

 

pacific war 2nd edition boardgame

Pacific War (2nd Ed.)
The 2nd Edition of the masterpiece
Pacific War game is coming soon!

▽Japan’s Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF)

 

organization of the JMSDF

The organization of the JMSDF
The units and structure of
the Modern Japanese Navy (JMSDF)

 

 

districts of the jmsdf

The Regional District Forces
The locations and bases of the
five regional districts of the JMSDF

 

 

DDH helicopter destroyers of the jmsdf

Helicopter Destroyers DDH
The modern helicopter destroyers
of the Japan’s Maritime Self-Defence Force

 

 

DDG Guided missile destroyer of the JMSDF

Guided Missile destroyers DDG
The advanced guided missile destroyers
of the Japan’s Maritime Self-Defence Force

 

 

DD destroyers of the JMSDF

Destroyers DD
The destroyers of the
Japan’s Maritime Self-Defence Force

 

 

Landing Tank ships of the jmsdf

Tank Landing Ships LST
The tank lading ships of the
Japan’s Maritime Self-Defence Force

 

 

submarines of the jmsdf

Submarines SS
The submarine fleet of the
Japan’s Maritime Self-Defence Force

 

 

auxiliary ships of the jmsdf

Support and Auxiliary ships
Patrol and other support ships of the
Japan’s Maritime Self-Defence Force

 

 

aviation and helicopter units of the jmsdf

The aviation of the JMSDF
Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force aircrafts
and helicopter fleet

 

 

naval landing forces of the jmsdf

Naval landing forces of the JMSDF
The naval forces for landings
of the JMSDF

 

 

new weapons of the jmsdf

Future projects of the JMSDF
New coming units and future
developments of the JMSDF

 

 

strategy of the jmsdf

The strategy of the JMSDF
The current doctrine and
strategy of the JMSDF

 

 

strategy of the jmsdf

News & manoeuvres
News and military
exercises of the JMSDF

▽ Simulations & Wargames

▽ World War II: European Theater

 

unconditional surrender

Unconditional Surrender
A boardgame with innovative mechanics
for the entire World War II in European Front.

 

 

supreme commander

The Supreme commander
A strategic game at corps/army level
for the World war II in Europe.

 

 

 


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Shares